Imported Upstream version 1.2.1
[packages/binwalk.git] / magic / images
1 # Tag Image File Format, from Daniel Quinlan (quinlan@yggdrasil.com)
2 # The second word of TIFF files is the TIFF version number, 42, which has
3 # never changed.  The TIFF specification recommends testing for it.
4 0       string          MM\x00\x2a      TIFF image data, big-endian
5 0       string          II\x2a\x00      TIFF image data, little-endian
6
7 # PNG [Portable Network Graphics, or "PNG's Not GIF"] images
8 # (Greg Roelofs, newt@uchicago.edu)
9 # (Albert Cahalan, acahalan@cs.uml.edu)
10 #
11 # 137 P N G \r \n ^Z \n [4-byte length] H E A D [HEAD data] [HEAD crc] ...
12 #
13 0       string          \x89PNG\x0d\x0a\x1a\x0a         PNG image
14 >16     belong          x               \b, %ld x
15 >20     belong          x               %ld,
16 >24     byte            x               %d-bit
17 >25     byte            0               grayscale,
18 >25     byte            2               \b/color RGB,
19 >25     byte            3               colormap,
20 >25     byte            4               gray+alpha,
21 >25     byte            6               \b/color RGBA,
22 #>26    byte            0               deflate/32K,
23 >28     byte            0               non-interlaced
24 >28     byte            1               interlaced
25
26 # GIF
27 0       string          GIF8            GIF image data
28 >4      string          7a              \b, version "8%s",
29 >4      string          9a              \b, version "8%s",
30 >6      leshort         >0              %hd x
31 >8      leshort         >0              %hd
32 #>10    byte            &0x80           color mapped,
33 #>10    byte&0x07       =0x00           2 colors
34 #>10    byte&0x07       =0x01           4 colors
35 #>10    byte&0x07       =0x02           8 colors
36 #>10    byte&0x07       =0x03           16 colors
37 #>10    byte&0x07       =0x04           32 colors
38 #>10    byte&0x07       =0x05           64 colors
39 #>10    byte&0x07       =0x06           128 colors
40 #>10    byte&0x07       =0x07           256 colors
41
42 # PC bitmaps (OS/2, Windows BMP files)  (Greg Roelofs, newt@uchicago.edu)
43 0       string          BM
44 >14     leshort         12              PC bitmap, OS/2 1.x format
45 >>18    leshort         x               \b, %d x
46 >>20    leshort         x               %d
47 >14     leshort         64              PC bitmap, OS/2 2.x format
48 >>18    leshort         x               \b, %d x
49 >>20    leshort         x               %d
50 >14     leshort         40              PC bitmap, Windows 3.x format
51 >>18    lelong          x               \b, %d x
52 >>22    lelong          x               %d x
53 >>28    leshort         x               %d
54 >14     leshort         128             PC bitmap, Windows NT/2000 format
55 >>18    lelong          x               \b, %d x
56 >>22    lelong          x               %d x
57 >>28    leshort         x               %d
58
59 #------------------------------------------------------------------------------
60 # JPEG images
61 # SunOS 5.5.1 had
62 #
63 #       0       string          \377\330\377\340        JPEG file
64 #       0       string          \377\330\377\356        JPG file
65 #
66 # both of which turn into "JPEG image data" here.
67 #
68 0       belong          0xffd8ffe0      JPEG image data, JFIF standard 
69 >6      string          !JFIF           invalid
70 # The following added by Erik Rossen <rossen@freesurf.ch> 1999-09-06
71 # in a vain attempt to add image size reporting for JFIF.  Note that these
72 # tests are not fool-proof since some perfectly valid JPEGs are currently
73 # impossible to specify in magic(4) format.
74 # First, a little JFIF version info:
75 >11    byte            x               \b %d.
76 >12    byte            x               \b%02d
77 # Next, the resolution or aspect ratio of the image:
78 #>>13   byte            0               \b, aspect ratio
79 #>>13   byte            1               \b, resolution (DPI)
80 #>>13   byte            2               \b, resolution (DPCM)
81 #>>4    beshort         x               \b, segment length %d
82 # Next, show thumbnail info, if it exists:
83 >18    byte            !0              \b, thumbnail %dx
84 >>19   byte            x               \b%d
85
86
87 0       belong          0xffd8ffe1      JPEG image data, EXIF standard
88 # EXIF moved down here to avoid reporting a bogus version number,
89 # and EXIF version number printing added.
90 #   - Patrik R=E5dman <patrik+file-magic@iki.fi>
91 >6      string          !Exif            invalid
92 # Look for EXIF IFD offset in IFD 0, and then look for EXIF version tag in EXIF IFD.
93 # All possible combinations of entries have to be enumerated, since no looping
94 # is possible. And both endians are possible...
95 # The combinations included below are from real-world JPEGs.
96 # Little-endian
97 >12    string          II
98 # IFD 0 Entry #5:
99 >>70   leshort         0x8769
100 # EXIF IFD Entry #1:
101 >>>(78.l+14)   leshort 0x9000
102 >>>>(78.l+23)  byte    x               %c
103 >>>>(78.l+24)  byte    x               \b.%c
104 >>>>(78.l+25)  byte    !0x30           \b%c
105 # IFD 0 Entry #9:
106 >>118  leshort         0x8769
107 # EXIF IFD Entry #3:
108 >>>(126.l+38)  leshort 0x9000
109 >>>>(126.l+47) byte    x               %c
110 >>>>(126.l+48) byte    x               \b.%c
111 >>>>(126.l+49) byte    !0x30           \b%c
112 # IFD 0 Entry #10
113 >>130  leshort         0x8769
114 # EXIF IFD Entry #3:
115 >>>(138.l+38)  leshort 0x9000
116 >>>>(138.l+47) byte    x               %c
117 >>>>(138.l+48) byte    x               \b.%c
118 >>>>(138.l+49) byte    !0x30           \b%c
119 # EXIF IFD Entry #4:
120 >>>(138.l+50)  leshort 0x9000
121 >>>>(138.l+59) byte    x               %c
122 >>>>(138.l+60) byte    x               \b.%c
123 >>>>(138.l+61) byte    !0x30           \b%c
124 # EXIF IFD Entry #5:
125 >>>(138.l+62)  leshort 0x9000
126 >>>>(138.l+71) byte    x               %c
127 >>>>(138.l+72) byte    x               \b.%c
128 >>>>(138.l+73) byte    !0x30           \b%c
129 # IFD 0 Entry #11
130 >>142  leshort         0x8769
131 # EXIF IFD Entry #3:
132 >>>(150.l+38)  leshort 0x9000
133 >>>>(150.l+47) byte    x               %c
134 >>>>(150.l+48) byte    x               \b.%c
135 >>>>(150.l+49) byte    !0x30           \b%c
136 # EXIF IFD Entry #4:
137 >>>(150.l+50)  leshort 0x9000
138 >>>>(150.l+59) byte    x               %c
139 >>>>(150.l+60) byte    x               \b.%c
140 >>>>(150.l+61) byte    !0x30           \b%c
141 # EXIF IFD Entry #5:
142 >>>(150.l+62)  leshort 0x9000
143 >>>>(150.l+71) byte    x               %c
144 >>>>(150.l+72) byte    x               \b.%c
145 >>>>(150.l+73) byte    !0x30           \b%c
146 # Big-endian
147 >12    string          MM
148 # IFD 0 Entry #9:
149 >>118  beshort         0x8769
150 # EXIF IFD Entry #1:
151 >>>(126.L+14)  beshort 0x9000
152 >>>>(126.L+23) byte    x               %c
153 >>>>(126.L+24) byte    x               \b.%c
154 >>>>(126.L+25) byte    !0x30           \b%c
155 # EXIF IFD Entry #3:
156 >>>(126.L+38)  beshort 0x9000
157 >>>>(126.L+47) byte    x               %c
158 >>>>(126.L+48) byte    x               \b.%c
159 >>>>(126.L+49) byte    !0x30           \b%c
160 # IFD 0 Entry #10
161 >>130  beshort         0x8769
162 # EXIF IFD Entry #3:
163 >>>(138.L+38)  beshort 0x9000
164 >>>>(138.L+47) byte    x               %c
165 >>>>(138.L+48) byte    x               \b.%c
166 >>>>(138.L+49) byte    !0x30           \b%c
167 # EXIF IFD Entry #5:
168 >>>(138.L+62)  beshort 0x9000
169 >>>>(138.L+71) byte    x               %c
170 >>>>(138.L+72) byte    x               \b.%c
171 >>>>(138.L+73) byte    !0x30           \b%c
172 # IFD 0 Entry #11
173 >>142  beshort         0x8769
174 # EXIF IFD Entry #4:
175 >>>(150.L+50)  beshort 0x9000
176 >>>>(150.L+59) byte    x               %c
177 >>>>(150.L+60) byte    x               \b.%c
178 >>>>(150.L+61) byte    !0x30           \b%c
179 # Here things get sticky.  We can do ONE MORE marker segment with
180 # indirect addressing, and that's all.  It would be great if we could
181 # do pointer arithemetic like in an assembler language.  Christos?
182 # And if there was some sort of looping construct to do searches, plus a few
183 # named accumulators, it would be even more effective...
184 # At least we can show a comment if no other segments got inserted before:
185 >(4.S+5)        byte            0xFE
186 >>(4.S+8)       string          >\0             \b, comment: "%s"
187 # FIXME: When we can do non-byte counted strings, we can use that to get
188 # the string's count, and fix Debian bug #283760
189 #>(4.S+5)       byte            0xFE            \b, comment
190 #>>(4.S+6)      beshort         x               \b length=%d
191 #>>(4.S+8)      string          >\0             \b, "%s"
192 # Or, we can show the encoding type (I've included only the three most common)
193 # and image dimensions if we are lucky and the SOFn (image segment) is here:
194 >(4.S+5)        byte            0xC0            \b, baseline
195 >>(4.S+6)       byte            x               \b, precision %d
196 >>(4.S+7)       beshort         x               \b, %dx
197 >>(4.S+9)       beshort         x               \b%d
198 >(4.S+5)        byte            0xC1            \b, extended sequential
199 >>(4.S+6)       byte            x               \b, precision %d
200 >>(4.S+7)       beshort         x               \b, %dx
201 >>(4.S+9)       beshort         x               \b%d
202 >(4.S+5)        byte            0xC2            \b, progressive
203 >>(4.S+6)       byte            x               \b, precision %d
204 >>(4.S+7)       beshort         x               \b, %dx
205 >>(4.S+9)       beshort         x               \b%d
206 # I've commented-out quantisation table reporting.  I doubt anyone cares yet.
207 #>(4.S+5)       byte            0xDB            \b, quantisation table
208 #>>(4.S+6)      beshort         x               \b length=%d
209 #>14    beshort         x               \b, %d x
210 #>16    beshort         x               \b %d
211
212 0       string  M88888888888888888888888888     Binwalk logo, ASCII art (Toph){offset-adjust:-50}
213 >27     string  !8888888888\n                   invalid
214